in visual media, fatness is presented as a problem to be fixes. Fatness becomes the subject of the show rather than the people themselves, and anything deemed ‘fat’ cannot exist without its accompanying value judgement. In short, media represents bodies as either adequate, or in the process of becoming adequate– and there is very little in between.

Jocelyn L. Bailey (“The Body Police: Lena Dunham, Susan Bordo, and HBO’s Girls,” 2015, pg. 31)

Generation(s) of Television Studies (Program Podcast Videos)

Program Podcast Video

The afternoon program consisted of presentations from a number of leading scholars of television, media and culture.

Each presentation can be viewed by clicking the corresponding link below. NOTE: Your web browser and computer may need to be reconfigured and settings adjusted to play podcast video in Quicktime format.

Amanda Lotz (University of Michigan), “The Cumulative Narrative of the Cumulative Narrative of Television Studies

James Hay (University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana), “Revisiting the Contradictions of the Birth of Television Studies–and Why That is Worth Doing Now

David Thorburn (MIT), “Unstable Platforms: Television in the Digital Age

Alisa Perren (Georgia State University), “Producer’s Medium to Producer’s Media: The Showrunner’s Shifting Authority in the Convergent Era

Tom Schatz (University of Texas at Austin), “Never the Twain Shall Meet: Film Studies, Television Studies, and the Nagging Issue of Authorship

Jeff Jones (Old Dominion University), “Politics and/of the Cultural Forum

Grady College Dean Cully Clark accepts support from Steve Koonin (President, Turner Entertainment Networks) to establish the Koonin Scholars Fund

Dr. Horace Newcomb (University of Georgia)Response

For anyone else who wanted to attend this but couldn’t, there are videos up of all the presentations now. Also, James Hamilton has posted audio-only podcasts on his page.