classes

Visiting Assistant Professor
English Department, Rochester Institute of Technology, August 2014 – present

Reading/Screening Desire (Fall 2015)
Reading/Screening Desire (Fall 2015)

Reading/Screening Desire
English 210 [flyer]

This class is about love, desire, happy endings and guilty pleasures. Over the course of the semester we will examine the representation of relationships across popular culture. The class will examine a variety of media texts, including: It Happened One Night, Before Sunrise, Looking, The L Word, and True Blood. This course asks: How do popular media represent gender, sexuality, and partnership? If genre is a space where we work through and rework cultural norms, what conversations are romantic stories having with us? How do happy endings and romantic fantasies intersect with the realities of class, race and sexual orientation? What social conflicts do these stories seek to mediate? Finally, how are relationship stories constructed for different audiences and organized across different media forms? The class takes up these questions by examining the role of genre in our culture and exploring what relationships look like in print, on film, and on the television screen.

Text + Code (Spring 2015)
Text + Code (Spring 2015)

Text and Code
English 215 (Taught online & face-to-face)

We encounter digital texts and codes every time we use a smart phone, turn on an app, read an e-book, or interact online. This course examines the innovative combinations of text & code that underpin emerging textual practices such as electronic literatures, digital games, mobile communication, geospatial mapping, interactive and locative media, augmented reality, and interactive museum design. Drawing on key concepts of text & code in fields such as media studies, literature, linguistics, creative writing, geospatial mapping, interactive and locative media, and computer science, students will analyze shifting expressive textual practices and develop the literacies necessary to read and understand them. Practicing and reflecting on such new media literacies, the course explores their social, cultural, creative, technological, and legal significance.

This specific section of English 215 is structured into three units: code, text, and process. Students begin by studying various conceptualizations of “code,” starting with semiotic codes, moving to programming codes and protocols, and finishing with the coding of identity within digital environments. Next, students take on the task of analyzing digital texts and working to make their codes visible. In this unit, students tackle a variety of concepts, including procedural rhetoric, glitch, uncreative writing, operational logics, and textual instruments. In the final unit, the class pulls back to examine broad cultural practices affected by text and code. These include issues of digital labor, property and copyright, and the digitization of physical environments.

Storytelling Across Media
English 375

Our lives are filled with media, but do you know how to decode them? This class introduces students to the building blocks of narrative in print, film, television and digital media. Taking each medium one at a time, we examine media forms and their narrative styles to understand how such storytelling strategies convey meaning and themes. Key concepts addressed in this course include: narrative forms, fundamental components of story, world building, and voice. Students learn to critically examine images and stories, while also taking into account the larger industrial and cultural ecosystems that media are produced in. We look at print, film, television and digital media individually and as parts of a larger flow of media content. Through readings, screenings, and discussions, students develop sophisticated understandings of media narratives in terms of technical and aesthetic properties, industrial practices, representation, cultural theories, social responses and more.

Participatory Culture (Spring 2015)
Participatory Culture (Spring 2015)

Participatory Culture: Audiences, Viewers, and Fans
English 210 [flyer]

From audiences sitting in the dark of the theater, to impassioned fans at conventions, there are many ways for us to engage with media. Popular culture inspires our passion, our participation, and sparks public debate. This class explores different historical periods, their dominant media forms, and theories of reception associated with them. Then, we will use this historical perspective to help us ask questions about contemporary media and participatory culture. This class looks at a variety of film, television, and digital media texts, including: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Color Purple, Battlestar Galactica, Doctor Who, remix projects, and major media franchises. We’ll also check out different YouTube Channels, “play” a digital documentary together, and look at transformative works projects like Wizard People Dear Reader. As we move through the course we will be regularly engaging with different media together. You will be asked to reflect on your own experiences as viewers and think about the ways media texts position and engage you. We will also investigate the historical context of our course texts, how they were marketed, and the debates they instigated.

(This class was originally developed for UW-Milwaukee.)

 

Future of Writing
English 150

This First Year Writing and Writing Intensive course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical writing, rhetorical reading, and critical thinking by focusing on particular uses of narrative. Increasingly, professionals, scholars, artists, and public figures recognize the use of stories across genres. Students acquire informed practice in using narrative in different disciplines, and become aware of storytelling as one among a number of rhetorical strategies for inquiry. Students are expected to give presentations as well as write papers both in response to the reading material and in services of their own independent arguments.

This specific section of English 150 is structured around a specific question: What do argument and analysis look like when combined with digital communication tools? The class use blogs and wikis to conduct research and produce writing. Students experiment with communicating their arguments and analysis via traditional papers, websites, blogs, remix projects, and digital video.

Film Studies Instructor/Teaching Assistant
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, September 2010 – May 2014

Instructor:

Participatory Culture (Spring 2014)
Participatory Culture (Spring 2014)

Participatory Culture: Audiences, Viewers, and Fans
Film Studies/English 212 [flyer]

From audiences sitting in the dark of the theater, to impassioned fans at conventions, there are many ways for us to engage with media. Popular culture inspires our passion, our participation, and sparks public debate. This class explores different historical periods, their dominant media forms, and theories of reception associated with them. Then, we use this historical perspective to help us ask questions about contemporary media and participatory culture. This class looks at a variety of film, television, and digital media texts, including: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Drive, Battlestar Galactica, remix projects, and major media franchises. We’ll also check out different YouTube Channels, “play” a digital documentary together, and look at transformative works projects like Wizard People Dear Reader. As we move through the course we will be regularly engaging with different media together. You will be asked to reflect on your own experiences as viewers and think about the ways media texts position and engage you. We will also investigate the historical context of our course texts, how they were marketed, and the debates they instigated.

Bad Romance (Spring 2013)

Bad Romance: Romance Genres Across Media
Film Studies/English 212 [flyer]

Historical and contemporary, chick-lit and chick flicks, vampires and Prada… This class is about love, desire, happy endings and guilty pleasures. Over the course of the semester we will explore representations of relationships across popular culture: in literature, film, and television. If genre is a space where we work through (and rework) different cultural norms, what tensions do genres of romance reveal regarding gender, relationships, and sexuality? What social conflicts do these stories seek to mediate? How do they represent men and women, desire, and partnership? Finally, how are romance narratives constructed for different audiences across different media forms? This course will take up these questions by examining what romance looks like in print, in film, on the television screen and, most importantly, by taking “bad romances” very seriously.

Television Studies (Spring 2013)
Television Studies (Spring 2013)

Introduction to Television Studies
Film Studies/English 291 (online) [flyer]

From watching cartoons in the living room to late night movies in our dorm rooms, for decades the television set has been an important fixture in many people’s daily lives. Today we also increasingly watch television on the go–using computers, cell phones, DVRs, and DVDs to keep up with our favorite shows. This course provides an introduction to television studies both by looking back and by looking forward. We will learn more about television’s past and the different factors shaping what television shows look like today. We will also discuss more recent technological changes, including the digitization of television, and how these things may affect what television looks like in the years to come. Due to its presence in our homes and as part of our daily lives, studying television has also become a way for us to study our society, to think about the ways television represents the world to its viewers, and to consider how viewers engage with television.  In this class we will watch a variety of television programs, learn more about different approaches to studying of television, and consider television’s larger role in popular culture and society.

Entertainment Arts: Film, Television, and the Internet
Film Studies/English 111 (online)

From cinema to cell phones, the multimedia context of contemporary life is rapidly changing. This course will examine some of those shifting and ubiquitous technologies and images by offering a general introduction to the critical study of film, television, and digital media. While examining each technology individually we will also work in a state of persistent comparison, endeavoring to comprehend media culture as a larger phenomenon. This will be achieved, in part, through weekly film, television, and/or digital media “screenings” that will catalyze reflections on media convergence. Through readings, screenings, and discussions, students will develop sophisticated understandings of media culture in terms of technical and aesthetic properties, industrial practices, representation, cultural theories, social responses and more.

Teaching Assistant:
Film History Part 1: 1895-1945 – Film Studies/Art History 205
Cinema and Digital Culture – Film Studies/English 312 (online)
Entertainment Arts: Film, Television, and the Internet – Film Studies/English 111

 

Composition Instructor/Teaching Assistant
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, September 2009 – present

Introduction to College Writing – English 101

 

Assistant Language Teacher
Gotemba Minami High School (with Japan Exchange & Teaching Program) August 2008 – July 2009

Assisted with English instruction in a Japanese high school. Developed weekly lesson plans and lead oral communications classes.

 

Teaching Assistant
Georgetown University, August 2007 – May 2008

Researching the Visual: Theory, Method and Practice – CCT 505 (teaching assistant)
Introduction to Communication, Culture, and Technology – CCT 698 (teaching assistant)